Seminole Tribe Seeks Governor’s Help For Offering Blackjack

Florida’s government had given the Seminole Tribe the exclusive rights to offer blackjack, baccarat and other popular card games in return for cut of $1 billion over five give years. But recently the state broke this promise of exclusivity by allowing online blackjack and poker across the state. Due to this development the Seminole Tribe has asked Gov. Rick Scott to dissolve the dispute and reach an amicable understanding. Tribal chairman has requested government permission to allow them to offer card games without paying any money to state as it does not have exclusivity any more. If this matter does not get resolved soon then the tribe can also approach federal courts for solution.

Five years ago the government of Florida had a formal agreement with Indian tribe Seminole to exclusively provide card games like baccarat, blackjack and others

Details of Seminole Compact

Five years ago the government of Florida had a formal agreement with Indian tribe Seminole to exclusively provide card games like baccarat, blackjack and others within the state which is referred to as “Seminole Compact”. If the government does not revoke the licence given to electronic gambling firms in the state then Seminole may stop paying the $200 million it is paying every to the state. The tribe’s chairman has sent a request to the governor’s office stating that it will keep paying the agreed amount to state till the problem is resolved.

About Seminole Tribe owned casinos

The Seminole Tribe has two casinos in Florida, namely we Seminole casino hotel at Immokalee and Hard Rock Hotel and Casino at Tampa. While earlier the tribe was willing to negotiate a new term with the state it has now asked for permission to keep running the blackjack and baccarat card tables without paying the high fees. This is because blackjack themed electronic slot machines are eating into their profits and soon Seminole may have to shut down the card tables. If no resolution is done within forthcoming thirty to sixty days then the tribe will seek mediation or sue the state for breach of contract.